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How to Roll Your R’s in Spanish

Today we teach you how to roll your R’s in Spanish even if you think you can’t! Plus a great student phrase for practicing (see vocab notes below – plus the first pronunciation video from Monday if you missed it!)

Get ready for our “Real Spanish Pronunciation” course coming tomorrow, Thursday.
UPDATE: The Course is Open Now with a Special Early-Bird Offer! Get it here now!

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Vocab from this video:

Doug’s Phrase:

“Un perro marrón y un perrito negro están corriendo muy rápidamente alrededor del carro rojo. ¡Qué raro!”

¡Qué ilusión! – How exciting

¡Qué fácil! – How easy

¡Qué pasada! – How cool, how great

¡Qué guay! – How cool

Una empollona – Someone who studies a lot

Me quedé flipada – I was amazed

Monday’s Pronunciation Video:

Vocab from this video:

Corre aquí una brisita maravillosa – There is a lovely breeze

¡Qué pasada! – How cool, how great

¡Qué ilusión! – How exciting

¡Qué guay! – How cool

¡Qué fácil! – How easy

UPDATE: The Course is Open Now with a Special Early-Bird Offer! Get it here now!

9 thoughts on “How to Roll Your R’s in Spanish”

  1. Regarding the air – perhaps it’s easier to roll your r’s when walking (and naturally breathing a bit harder)? I definitely can’t roll mine – although, very occasionally, I can a little bit – and the last time I did I was walking out of a cafe and saying something quite lively as a goodbye to the proprietors.

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  2. También se puede decir “arroz” o “arroz con cerdo”. Al principio es más fácil practicar con una palabra que no comienza con la “r”. Además, aprendí a relajar la punta de la lengua y dejar que el aire expulsado hiciera el trabajo. Similar a exhalar a través de los labios relajados con la boca cerrada. Además, en lugar de acostarse, simplemente inclinar ligeramente la cabeza hacia atrás y mirar hacia arriba ayuda a que la lengua esté en la posición correcta. Espero que esto sea útil.
    In English:
    One can also say “arroz” or “arroz con cerdo”. It’s easier in the beginning to practice on a word that doesn’t start with the “r”. Also, I learned to relax the tip of the tongue and let the expelled air do the work. Similar to blowing breath out through relaxed lips with your mouth closed. Also, instead of lying down, just tilting the head back slightly and looking up helps to get the tongue in the right position. Hope this is helpful.

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  3. Also, having watched another video, if you put a ‘d’ or a ‘t’ in front of the ‘r’ to be rolled, this can help (indeed, it is the only way I can hope to do it). Putting an ‘a’ in front doesn’t help me, I’m afraid. Perhaps this is the sort of thing that can only be taught in person, at least for some of us!

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  4. Yes – When pronouncing the single ‘r’ or the double ‘rr’ I often think of it as a ‘d’ and it definitely helps me get the tongue in the proper position. ‘Tren’ and ‘traer’ are two good words to use for practice.

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  5. I am in the fortunate position that, although now living in England, I was born in Scotland where a rolling r is part of everyday speech. I have more difficulty remembering not to pronounce ‘h’ and the v for b. Glad to hear that help with the latter is coming soon.

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  6. I have tried so many times to roll my rrs by putting my tongue towards roof of my mouth. I sound like I’m choking !! But … and here’s the but – when I press or put my tongue behind my lower teeth out comes the rolled rrs no problem and without actually trying. But is this correct ? Anyone else do this?

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